For me, one of the highlights of Artisterium VI in Tbilisi, Georgia was the 3 day programme of artists’ films entitled “Difference Screen”. About 30 different films, from Ireland to Iran, from Norway to New Zealand, it broadened my horizons and opened my eyes to all sorts of different stories from the far corners of the world. There was an interesting panel discussion at the end of each day with the curators Bruce Allan and Ben Eastop, mediated by Gareth Evans of the Whitechapel Gallery in London. One of those discussions led to the question of ‘Art and Politics’ – a thorny subject, or at least a thorny subject where …

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I’m waiting at the gate to let people onto Lots Ait island. Every forty seconds a droning plane overhead comes in to land at Heathrow. Lights flashing, passenger portholes visible I think of Bladerunner. Soon I join the audience and I’m in a mellow mood this evening. Barge Ideaal is another remarkable context, this time converting a home to public theatre. The films presented are wide-ranging in style and intent and I have seen some of them before. This gives me a privileged opportunity to reflect and consider. I try to avoid the restrictions of comparison and value judgement. There are actions and re-actions, no fantasies or fictions. As performer …

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What a wonderful warm and generous evening we all enjoyed last Saturday 21st September on Ben Eastop’s boat. I’m still carrying around with me the vision of the phenomenal landscape in which Barge Ideaal is moored. We arrived at dusk to be met at the bridge and escorted across the river to the island and then onto the pontoon to the boat. The scale of the whole thing brought to mind thoughts of the Styx and other Chinese stories of boatmen and portals into another world. Exceptionally beautiful at dusk, this certainly didn’t feel like London as on arrival the reflections in the water revealed enormous cranes, other huge mysterious …

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07.09.2013 ARKO, Seoul. An afternoon programme of Difference Screen films was seen by an appreciative audience at ARKO. Preservation is Future A highlight of NDH in Korea 2013 was the exhibition Preservation is Future at the Moodeung Museum of Contemporary Art, Gwangju. An essay by Annelise Zwez catches its environmental concerns. Annelise presented the essay as an illustrated talk that preceded the Difference Screen programme. Preservation is Future Report azw

Can the deep space of a cave complement the mass of a mountain I wondered? We reached our destination in a few steps down from vivid heat to monochrome cold, a short journey underground where everything became different. I felt immediately inverted, my gravity and perception shaken by lands turned upside-down, dangerous journeys, perilous events, improbable space travel. I was immersed in amusing and troubling true stories told by young and old voices of many tongues and times. I was entranced by the necessity to build a shelter from dessicated sticks on a hot beach or shout at glaciers or be absolutely still for 3 minutes 31 seconds. I forgot …

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What a fantastic achievement to bring the world to this subterranean venue. The films emphasized that there is no such thing as a neutral space, that humanity appropriates and modifies all landscape, and that if you think you know landscape, look again. To screen this in the most changed of spaces added a real edge to the experience; to feel dirt beneath your chair and ochre under your finger nails, was as fundamental as many of the films on screen. More please. Jem Waygood

Many thanks for last Friday… it was wonderful being down into the caves and really added to the programme of films… such a contrast to the warm summer evening above ground. I found the last film very moving and several images have lingered. It was particularly interesting to view that film after seeing ‘I am Nisrine’ at the Watershed a couple of weeks ago which was about the experience of two teenagers, sent by their parents to England from Iran and arriving in Newcastle, the relationships they formed – a wonderful powerful film. I also really enjoyed the Kama3 with the guy’s steadfast unblinking gaze, although I wanted them to …

Friday night Read more »