Greetings from the 5th floor of the Yeha guest house and gallery, Seoul, a great base camp for our onward adventure, currently shared with NDHeaders Park Byoung-Uk (Korea), Susanne Muller, Daniela de Maddalena (Switzerland), Gabriel Adams (US) and Ola Janik and Magda Hlawacz (Poland). Susanne and Gabriel had an opening at the CY gallery last night. Performance artist Hyosung Pang invited us to a traditional meal in a tiny restaurant for traditional Bibimbap, one of Korea’s many delicious dishes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibimbap Tropical temps bring a sauna like feel to Seoul in comparison with the UK. We’re about to fly to Ulaanbaatar with the further prospect of nights in yurts, Ger in …

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Difference Screen travels to Ulaanbaatar and Seoul in association with Nine Dragon Heads Nomadic Party #3. The screenings at the Mongolian National Modern Art Gallery are part of the NDH exhibition Ger to Ger. Nomadic Party #3 continues through Mongolia as a rolling symposium before returning to South Korea where Difference Screen programmes will be shown on 7th September at ARKO, Seoul, the gallery of the Arts Council of Korea. Many thanks to Park Byoung-Uk, Founder of Nine Dragon Heads for setting up these possibilities. Nine Dragon Heads Nine Dragon Heads brings together artists from many countries with the aim of stimulating creativity and mutual understanding through shared experience. Founded …

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photo: Carolyn Black Saturday 13th July – what a contrast. Another extraordinary location to watch a set of artist made films on one of the hottest evenings at the height of summer. It was a bit cosy upstairs beneath the uninsulated loft of an old red brick Victorian factory! Last used as a printing works it’s now an innovative artists’ project space in the middle of Regency Cheltenham. Two electric fans on full blast moved the hot air around the twelve of us sitting as motionlessly as possible, engrossed by the films and trying to reach some equilibrium in the heat. I felt a kind of kinaesthetic symbiosis with the …

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Can the deep space of a cave complement the mass of a mountain I wondered? We reached our destination in a few steps down from vivid heat to monochrome cold, a short journey underground where everything became different. I felt immediately inverted, my gravity and perception shaken by lands turned upside-down, dangerous journeys, perilous events, improbable space travel. I was immersed in amusing and troubling true stories told by young and old voices of many tongues and times. I was entranced by the necessity to build a shelter from dessicated sticks on a hot beach or shout at glaciers or be absolutely still for 3 minutes 31 seconds. I forgot …

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What a fantastic achievement to bring the world to this subterranean venue. The films emphasized that there is no such thing as a neutral space, that humanity appropriates and modifies all landscape, and that if you think you know landscape, look again. To screen this in the most changed of spaces added a real edge to the experience; to feel dirt beneath your chair and ochre under your finger nails, was as fundamental as many of the films on screen. More please. Jem Waygood

The high spot for me of last Friday’s DifferenceScreen at Clearwell Caves was when I was removed from being underground and cold by being drawn into The Day I Disappeared 2011 by Atousa Bandeh Ghiasabadi. The psychological estrangement of exile was deftly handled by Atousa’s weaving of beautiful imagery from past and present. The pain of loss and dislocation gradually evolving into better times. Always a good sign when you are left with a clear feeling that you want to see it again! There was plenty more dislocation (some funny too) in some of the other short films… AndrewD

Many thanks for last Friday… it was wonderful being down into the caves and really added to the programme of films… such a contrast to the warm summer evening above ground. I found the last film very moving and several images have lingered. It was particularly interesting to view that film after seeing ‘I am Nisrine’ at the Watershed a couple of weeks ago which was about the experience of two teenagers, sent by their parents to England from Iran and arriving in Newcastle, the relationships they formed – a wonderful powerful film. I also really enjoyed the Kama3 with the guy’s steadfast unblinking gaze, although I wanted them to …

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